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A film about the loneliness, despair and hope of six people who all live in a bleak Soviet-era apartment complex in Tallinn, Estonia.

Autumn Ball is a 2007 Estonian drama film directed by Veiko Õunpuu, adapted from Mati Unt’s 1979 novel of the same name. The film depicts six desolate people of different yet similar fates in characteristically Soviet pre-fabricated housing units. It premiered at the 64th Venice International Film Festival, where it won the Horizon Award.

Critic Reviews

‘Emboldened by alcohol and steeped in despair, the characters in Sugisball lunge for love but would settle for understanding.’

Awards

Bratislava International Film Festival 2007 Winner Best Director

Lisbon & Estoril Film Festival 2007 Winner Special Critics Award

Nika Awards 2009 Nominee Nika Best Film of the CIS and Baltics

Transilvania International Film Festival 2008 Winner Best Cinematography

During WWII, a German couple receive news that their only son has been killed in battle. Already disillusioned with the Nazi regime, they begin a campaign of civil disobedience and write messages on postcards urging fellow Germans to resist.
Laure flammarion and Arnaud Uyttenhove, two young European filmmakers followed, the American photographer Alec Soth all over America during winter 2008, summer 2008 and spring 2009. Riding in the back of the artist’s van, they drove more than 20 000 miles together going from one state to another, and from one season to another. The result is a 57 minutes movie about the photographer and his project, which was called ‘How to disappear in America’, about people who decided to withdraw themselves from society. The road trip offers a series of incredible meetings but it also tells the story of an introspective journey.
Thought Exchange is a simple yet profound way of looking at the world, that allows us to understand and experience the truth about who we really are, where we really live, what we really want, and how to have that all the time. It’s not about positive thinking, it’s about thinking… The Thought Exchange comes to us from the creative mind of Usher Morgan, who is an award-winning screenwriter, film director, producer and studio executive residing in New York City. The Thought Exchange film shows us that there is a simple, yet profound way of looking at the world. A way that allows us to understand and experience the truth about who we really are, where we really live, what we really want, and how to have that all the time. The film is created by David Friedman, who is most well known for his roles in the music department for many disney films including Aladdin, Pocahontas and Hunchback of Notre Dame.

Critic Reviews

‘The film definitely has an agenda of positivity that is presented in a simple to understand manner. Unlike The Secret, The Thought Exchange is not relayed in a heavy handed manner. It’s rather uplifting and presented lightly with a dynamic use of ethereal music. Throughout the film, I never felt like I was being convinced of anything. I truly felt that the people in the piece believed and actually followed the methodology of The Thought Exchange.’
A deep space mining vessel has been adrift for two years. It is suspected the crew brutally killed each other, but the reason for the bloodbath is unknown. A rescue crew is sent to find if there are any survivors, what happened and why. A crew is sent to find out if there are any survivors on a deep-space mining vessel that has been adrift for two years.

Awards

Boston Science Fiction Film Festival, US 2017, winner of best special FX Los Angeles Movie Awards, US 2017, winner of the best narrative feature, best director, best cinematography, best costume design, bets production design, best set direction. American Movie Awards 2018, winner of best direction
The Last Animals follows the conservationists, scientists and activists battling poachers and criminal networks to save elephants and rhinos from extinction. Winner of best international feature at the North West Fest Film Festival, The Last Animals is a story about an extraordinary group of people who go to incredible lengths to save the planet’s last animals. The documentary follows the conservationists, scientists and activists battling poachers and criminal Networks to protect elephants and rhinos from extinction. From Africa’s front lines to behind the scenes of Asian markets to the United States, the film takes an intense look at the global response to this slaughter and the desperate measures to genetically rescue the Northern White rhinos who are on the edge of extinction. The film has also won best documentary at San Diego International Film Festival and Anchorage International Film Festival.

Critic Reviews

‘Testimonials cover a wide range, including England’s Prince William who helps to bring it all into perspective.’ Seattle Times ‘Concern for animals aside, this is a portrait of capitalism at its most destructive, and rhinos and elephants are not the only creatures it will leave you fearful for.’ Eye for Film ‘Filmic, often elegiac, and hopefully galvanising.’ Screen International

Awards

Anchorage International Film Festival 2017, Best Documentary Feature NORTHWESTFEST International Documentary & Media Arts Festival 2017, winner of best international feature San Diego International Film Festival 2017, winner of the festival award for best documentary Tribeca Film Festival 2017, winner of the Disruptive Innovation Award
Tells the extraordinary story of legendary musician Wilko Johnson who, diagnosed with incurable pancreatic cancer and given a few months to live, managed to accept his fate with uplifting positivity and defy the death sentence handed down to him. Winner of the Jury Prize for best international documentary at In-Edit 2015, The Ecstasy of Wilko Johnson is a 2015 documentary which confronts our worst nightmares of impending death, confounding expectations and turning them upside down. It tells the extraordinary, yet universal story of legendary musician Wilko Johnson, who diagnosed with incurable pancreatic cancer and given a few months to live, managed to accept his fate with uplifting positivity and defy the death sentence handed down to him.

Critic Reviews

‘Wilko is irrepressibly energetic, holding forth on life, love, the universe and above all the prospect of death.’ Guardian ‘This is a moving portrait of a remarkable man, which is at its most effective when it just lets him speak.’ CineVue ‘Part biopic, part arty collage film, part scenic ramble through the great guitarist’s synaptic labyrinth.’ Time Out

Awards

In-Edit 2015, winner of the Jury Prize for best international documentary FOCAL International Awards 2016, winner of the FOCAL award for best use of footage in a documentary feature
An unnerving story about a horrid family drama kept behind closed doors, and an elaborate facade where appearances can be deceiving, and nothing is as it seems. Miss Violence is a 2013 Greek film directed by Alexandros Avranas. It entered the competition at the 70th Venice International Film Festival. Avranas won the Silver Lion for Best Director and actor Themis Panou won the Volpi Cup for Best Actor. The latest in the remarkable wave of iconoclastic new Greek cinema that yielded Dogtooth and Attenberg, the film unfolds with a skin-crawling sense of deadpan detachment before it explodes in shattering tragedy.

Critic Reviews

‘Ever since Yorgos Lanthimos’ Dogtooth wowed audiences back in 2009, Greek cinema has become the new Michael Haneke.’ StarBurst ‘Miss Violence is a grim tale of family dysfunction that also stands as an allegory about moral and economic decline in Greek society.’ Independent UK ‘From the not-so-happy birthday that opens the film … up to the harrowing final revelation, Miss Violence fulfils the grisly promise of its title.’ TimeOut

Awards

Hellenic Film Academy Awards 2014 Winner of the Hellenic Film Academy Award for Best Actor and Best Supporting Actress Los Angeles Greek Film Festival (LAGFF) 2014 Winner of the Orpheus Award for Best Feature Film Montréal Festival of New Cinema 2013 Winner of the Innovation Award – International Competition Stockholm Film Festival 2013 Winner of the Aluminum Horse for Best Script Venice Film Festival 2013 Winner Best Euro-Mediterranean Film Winner of the Silver Lion for Best Director Winner of the Volpi Cup for Best Actor Winner of the Young Cinema Award for Best Film in Competition
A young woman develops a taste for human blood after experimental plastic surgery, and her victims turn into blood-thirsty zombies, leading into a city-wide epidemic. Rabid is an award winning Canadian-American drama, horror film written and directed by David Cronenberg. It features Marilyn Chambers in the lead role, supported by Frank Moore, Joe Silver and Howard Ryshpan.

Critic Reviews

‘None of the other recent apocalypse movies has shown so much political or cinematic sophistication.’ Time Out ‘An intelligent predecessor to some more moronic efforts in the same genre.’ Film 4


Awards

Sitges – Catalonian International Film Festival Winner of best Screenplay and Best Special Effects
Four American soldiers and one Brit fighting in Europe during World War II struggle to return to Allied territory after being separated from U.S. forces during the historic Malmedy Massacre.

Saints and Soldiers is a 2003 war drama film directed by Ryan Little and produced by Little and Adam Abel. It is loosely based on events that took place after the Malmedy massacre during the Battle of the Bulge. The film stars Corbin Allred, Alexander Niver, Lawrence Bagby, and Peter Asle Holden as the four American soldiers trying to return Kirby Heyborne, a British soldier with vital intelligence, to the Allied lines.

The Washington Times called the film, “one of the sharpest and most compelling entries of the early ‘Mormon cinema’ era”. The New York Times wrote that the film’s, “impressive cast of largely unknown actors and meticulously researched film tells its story with quiet conviction.”

Critic Review

‘It has the strengths and the clean lines of a traditional war movie, without high-tech special effects to pump up the noise level.’ Chicago Sun Times

‘Thoughtful, engaging World War II movie has battle violence.’ Common Sense Media

Awards

Gloria Film Festival 2003 Winner of the Audience Award and Winner of the Jury Award

Heartland International Film Festival 2003 Winner of the Crystal Heart Award and Winner of the Grand Prize for Dramatic Feature

Ojai Film Festival 2003 Winner of the Best Narrative Feature

Sacramento Festival of Cinema 2003 Winner of the Audience Award

San Diego Film Festival 2003 Winner of the Audience Award

Temecula Valley International Film Festival 2003 Winner of the Viewer’s Choice Award for Best Feature Film

A reindeer-breeding Sámi girl who is exposed to the racism of the 1930’s at her boarding school, starts dreaming of another life. But to achieve it, she has to become someone else and break all ties with her family and culture.

Sami Blood is a 2016 Swedish coming-of-age drama film written and directed by Amanda Kernell, as her feature film debut. The first 10 minutes of the film (and part of the end) comes directly from the short film Stoerre Vaerie. Stoerre Vaerie is Kernell’s first film with Sami themes and it was nominated for the Short Film Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival, Park City, Utah, USA.

The film premiered at the 73rd edition of the Venice Film Festival in the Venice Days section, in which it was awarded the Europa Cinemas Label Award and the Fedeora Award for Best Debut Director. It won the 2017 Lux Prize and was nominated for the 2017 Nordic Council Film Prize.

Critic Reviews

‘An eloquent coming-of-age drama set in 1930s Sweden that revolves around a spellbinding performance by young Lene Cecilia Sparrok.’ Los Angeles Times

‘”Sami Blood” is a beautiful, haunting film, anchored by a startlingly accomplished lead performance. It has the feeling of a distant memory – one that is neither entirely pleasant nor painful, but persistent.’ Washington Post

‘Swedish helmer Amanda Kernell makes a stirring debut with a coming-of-age tale that pointedly addresses a bygone era of Scandi colonialism.’ Variety

Awards

BZN International Film Festival 2018 Winner of the Audience Award – Narrative Feature

Fargo Film Festival 2018 Winner Best Narrative Feature

Guldbagge Awards 2018 Winner of the Audience Award Winner Guldbagge for Best Actress Winner of Best Screenplay

Göteborg Film Festival 2017 Winner Dragon Award for Best Nordic Film

Kosmorama, Trondheim Internasjonale Filmfestival 2017 Winner of the Audience Award

Luxembourg City Film Festival 2017 Winner of the Youth Jury Award

Newport Beach Film Festival 2017 Winner of the Audience Award for best Foreign Feature

Riviera International Film Festival 2017 Winner Jury Prize for Best Director

Venice Film Festival 2016 Winner of the Fedeora Award for Best Director of a Debut Film (Venice Days)

A romantic comedy-drama, Nothing in Los Angeles chronicles a young artist’s bittersweet love affair with the city of Los Angeles, focusing on the fleeting nature of personal relationships and professional dreams. With a sterling soundtrack, Nothing in Los Angeles charmed audiences during it’s independent film festival run. Set in Los Angeles, California, it’s a tale of love and relationships, both personal and professional and the trials and tribulations that come along with them all.

Critic Reviews

“Nothing in Los Angeles was one of the most entertaining and satisfying films I saw all year.” Cinequest.

Awards

Hollywood Reel Independent Film Festival, 2014. Winner of the Best Filmed Screenplay, Best Actor and best Supporting Actress. Los Angeles Movie Awards, 2014. Winner of best narrative feature. Route 66 Film Festival, 2014. Winner of the people’s choice competition. Studio City Film Festival, 2014. Winner of best comedy feature and winner of best screenplay – feature.
South of Beirut, Lebanon is a 68 year old refugee camp housing refugees from Palestine, Syria and Iraq. Many have lived in this camp their entire lives– Mariam AlShaar is one of them. Now, Mariam has pulled the women of this camp together to do what has never been done before. They started with a small kitchen from a micro-loan. With nearly insurmountable political odds against them– they look to start the first refugee food truck. Their journey is one of many ups and downs but it is the community that is built, their sense of hope and how they see themselves that makes this a moving, touching film about their journey. Mariam has been known as ‘the crazy lady’ and now she will show just how crazy she is. Soufra follows the inspirational story of intrepid social entrepreneur, Mariam Shaar – a refugee who has spent her entire life in the 69-year-old Burl El Barajneh refugee camp south of Beirut, Lebanon.

Critic Reviews

‘The footage of the food is positively mouthwatering, a salient reminder of its ability to unite people within a culture as well as outside it.’ Chicago Reader ‘A stirring tale of empowerment, the documentary “Soufra” shows how societal change can begin with small steps.’ New York Times ‘To consider the long-standing Bourj al Barajneh is to consider the true humanity of refugees, who have hopes, dreams, lives to live and work to do. “Soufra” efficiently and effectively illustrates those ideas.’ Los Angeles Times

Awards

Cinetopia Film Festival 2018, Foreign Documentary El Gouna International Film Festival 2017, Cinema for Humanity Prize, Mentor Arabia Award, Golden Star. Florida Film Festival 2018, winner of the audience award Galway Film Fleadh 2018, Best International Feature Documentary Napa Valley Film Festival 2018, winner of the audience award San Diego International Film Festival 2018, winner of the audience award
The story follows a man who returns home to discover a long-buried family secret, and whose attempts to put things right threaten the lives of those he left home years before. The Daughter is a 2015 Australian drama film written and directed by Simon Stone, starring an ensemble cast led by Geoffrey Rush. After a fifteen-year absence, Christian (Paul Schneider) returns home to rural New South Wales for the marriage of his father, Henry (Academy Award winner Geoffrey Rush), the wealthy owner of the local mill that’s been the economic bedrock of the community for generations. Christian gets reacquainted with his old friend Oliver (Ewen Leslie) and finds himself drawn to Oliver’s family, which includes wife Charlotte (Miranda Otto), daughter Hedvig (Odessa Young), and father-in-law Walter (Sam Neill). When Henry announces the imminent closure of the mill, it sends a quake through the community, particularly Oliver’s family, and the subsequent fissures release bitter secrets. With The Daughter, debuting writer-director Simon Stone turns Henrik Ibsen’s The Wild Duck into a thoughtful meditation on the bonds of family, friendship, and community.

Critic Reviews

‘Made with taste, skill and discretion, “The Daughter” demonstrates both the staying power of classic material and the risks inherent in bringing it up to date.’ Los Angeles Times ‘In his atmospheric debut film, Australian theater director Simon Stone whittles down The Wild Duck into a cautionary tale about welcoming home an emotional exile.’ Village Voice ‘Subtle and skilled, this simmers for long periods until its highly satisfying finale.’ Total Film ‘Beautiful and powerful, The Daughter occasionally veers towards the melodramatic – but who cares when every element is this good?’ One Room With a View

Awards

Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA) Awards 2016 Winner of the AACTA Award for Best Lead Actress, Best Supporting Actress, and Best Adapted Screenplay Australian Cinematographers Society 2017 Winner of the Award of Distinction – Feature Productions Cinema Film Critics Circle of Australia Awards 2017 Winner of the FCCA Award for Best Actress, Best Actress in a Supporting Role, and Best Actor in a Supporting Role
In the war-torn Nuba Mountains of Sudan, American doctor Tom Catena selflessly and courageously serves the needs of a forgotten people, while the region is bombed relentlessly by an indicted war criminal, Omar Al-Bashir. Two things remain constant: Dr. Tom’s faith and his enduring love for the Nuba people. The only surgeon within 200 miles, ‘Dr. Tom’ and a small Sudanese staff treat as many as 400 patients a day at Mother of Mercy Hospital, located in the heart of the Nuba Mountains. The region is the latest target of aerial bombardment by the Sudanese government, ordered by Omar al-Bashir, a dictator wanted by the International Criminal Court for crimes against humanity and war crimes. Living under the constant shadow of bombers overhead, Dr. Tom and his staff defy Bashir’s ban on humanitarian aid, work tirelessly to save the lives of the Nuba people, and bring hope to one million people who would be otherwise forgotten.

Critic Reviews

‘Absorbingly, unfussily captures Catena’s daily challenges and feats while also painting a vivid, often heartbreaking portrait of a forgotten people trapped in an underreported sociopolitical nightmare.’ Los Angeles Times ‘The Heart of Nuba delivers a moving but thankfully not overly sentimental portrait of this admirable figure.’ Hollywood Reporter ‘The film is worth seeing because it’s a moving and remarkable story and it represents a great cause.’ New York Times

Awards

Hollywood Film Festival 2017, Most Impactful Documentary Feature
A young Pakistani man is chasing corporate success on Wall Street. He finds himself embroiled in a conflict between his American Dream, a hostage crisis, and the enduring call of his family’s homeland. The Reluctant Fundamentalist is an award winning 2012 political thriller drama film based on the 2007 novel. The film tells a post-9/11 story about the impact of the Al Qaeda attacks on one Pakistani man and his treatment by Americans in reaction to them. The film premiered as the opening film for the 69th Venice International Film Festival, and at the 37th Toronto International Film Festival. The film won “Centenary Award” at the 43rd International Film Festival of India. The film has received several awards, many of them honouring the film’s efforts to address tolerance and xenophobia.

Critic Reviews

‘Nair has found a real gem in Riz Ahmed, who anchors the film with a charismatically watchable performance. He’s in virtually every frame and you hang on his every word.’ Toronto Star ‘A film like this stands or falls on the performance of its lead, and the young British actor Riz Ahmed doesn’t disappoint.’ Washington Examiner ‘I found several of the story’s twists both startling and, in retrospect, totally believable.’ The American Conservatist ‘Nair lets her drama unfold thoughtfully and draws impressive supporting performances from Kiefer Sutherland, as Changez’s Wall Street boss, and Liev Schreiber.’ The Mail on Sunday (UK)

Awards

CAAMFest 2013 Winner of the Audience Award for Best Narrative – Mira Nair Mill Valley Film Festival 2012 Winner of the Audience Award for Favourite World Feature – Mira Nair Munich Film Festival 2013 Winner of the Bernhard Wicki Film Award for Best Film – Mira Nair (director)
‘There And No Innocent Bystanders’, a new film chronicling The Libertines’ past, present and future. The film gives an intimate insight into a band (The Libertines) reforming. The film captures the spirit of the band: stories and moments retold and relived by the band themselves. Profiling each band member individually and collectively — something which has never been done before — the film gives each of the boys the chance to put their story in their way.

Critic Reviews

“The film is a fair slice of nostalgia about one of the most influential bands to ever come from Britain. And though you might distance yourself from the lingering indie fall out that haunts the streets of Camden in 2014, any British music fan who owned a guitar during the last ten years would be lying if they said Up The Bracket didn’t feel godly at some point during their formative years.” Vice
Kris and Lindy Boustedt’s This Is Ours deals with the complexity of married life and, among other things, what happens when everything you did to live the life you wanted winds up disappointing you. From Kris Boustedt is an editor and producer, known for Perfect 10 (2010), Ten Years Later (2014) and Brides to Be (2016) comes This is Ours. A powerful all American drama which tells the story of Will and Karen, who take a final trip to their vacation home. While there, they meet new friends, embarking on a strange journey of discovery, heartbreak and hope. In a similar way to the powerful indie relationship drama Blue Valentine, the Boustedts’ story gets a lot of its impact from a structure that shifts back and forth from the past to the present.

Critic Reviews

“This is Ours, the self-assured second feature from writing/producing/directing team Kris and Lindy Boustedt, made its world premiere at Dances with Films in Hollywood. It’s a beautifully shot and emotionally charged foray into the world of a once-happy couple whose lives and relationship verge on disintegration.” Living in Cinema.
Through a focus on the life of Dalton Trumbo (1905-1976), this film examines the effects on individuals and families of a congressional pursuit of Hollywood Communists after World War II. Trumbo was one of several writers, directors, and actors who invoked the First Amendment in refusing to answer questions under oath. They were blacklisted and imprisoned. We follow Trumbo to prison, to exile in Mexico with his family, to poverty, to the public shunning of his children, to his writing under others’ names, and to an eventual but incomplete vindication. Trumbo is a 2007 American documentary film directed by Peter Askin, produced by Will Battersby, Tory Tunnell, and Alan Klingenstein, and written by Christopher Trumbo. It is based on the letters of Trumbo’s father, Dalton Trumbo, an Oscar-winning screenwriter who was imprisoned and blacklisted as a member of the Hollywood Ten, ten screenwriters, directors and producers who refused to testify before the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) in 1947 during the committee’s investigation of Communist influences in the Hollywood film industry. The film debuted at the Toronto International Film Festival and includes film clips and interviews, readings from Trumbo’s letters by performers such as Michael Douglas, Joan Allen, Donald Sutherland, Liam Neeson, and Paul Giamatti, and a reenactment by David Strathairn of a speech given by Dalton Trumbo in 1970. The readings include parts of what the New York Times calls “Dalton Trumbo’s remarkably stage-ready personal letters”[2] that cover the period from the late 1940s to the early 1960s. Interspersed with these are archival clips from the HUAC hearings, footage from home movies, and “exceptionally well-selected interview clips with Trumbo”.

Critic Reviews

‘The transporting power of this experience is in the passionate and almost outlandishly eloquent verbal expression Trumbo poured into his correspondence, and the vividly American principles he defends.’ film.com ‘It will serve as a fine entry point for younger auds interested in learning about theprice paid by moviemakers and their families swept up in the 1950s anti-Communist net.’ Variety ‘The film is an enlightening recap of ’50s Red Scare politics, and a parade of actors giving meaningful, earnest readings of Trumbo’s speeches and letters.’ Newsday.

Awards

Winner Freedom of Expression Award at the National Board of Review, USA
Terry Gilliam’s doomed attempt to get his film, The Man Who Killed Don Quixote (2018), off the ground.

Lost in La Mancha is a 2002 documentary film about the making of Terry Gilliam’s first attempt at The Man Who Killed Don Quixote. His effort was a film adaptation of the novel Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes. The documentary was shot in 2000 during Gilliam’s first attempt to make the film, as an intended work of the genre known as the “making-of”. But Gilliam’s failure to complete his movie resulted in the documentary filmmakers retitling their work as Lost in la Mancha and releasing it independently.

Critic Leonard Maltin has described Lost in La Mancha as one of the best films about the process of moviemaking. It was nominated for various awards, including a BAFTA Award and a Satellite Award for Best Documentary Film. It won a Satellite Award for Best Documentary.

Critic Reviews

‘Anyone who thinks making movies is easy needs to see this hilariously painful cautionary tale. It’s a tribute to Gilliam that he never once took off his mike or asked the filmmakers to stop rolling.’ Newsweek

‘Gilliam himself is a joy to behold. His wit stays sharp even as his fortunes dull, and the conditions that conspire against him only prove the mettle in our man of La Mancha.’ Globe and Mail

‘A fascinating chronicle of bad luck, bad faith and bad weather all striking on the same day.’ Washington Post


Awards

Evening Standard British Film Awards 2003 Winner Peter Sellers Award for Comedy Keith Fulton

Satellite Awards 2004 Winner Golden Satellite Award Best Documentary DVD