In New York City 1981, an ambitious immigrant fights to protect his business and family during the most dangerous year in the city's history. A Most Violent Year is a 2014 American crime drama film written and directed by J. C. Chandor. The film stars Oscar Isaac and Jessica Chastain with Alessandro Nivola, David Oyelowo, Albert Brooks, and Catalina Sandino Moreno. The protagonist is Abel Morales (Isaac), the owner of a small heating-oil company who is stressed by the competitiveness in the oil trade and his having to secure costly loans to expand his business. When his trucks start being hijacked, there is increased pressure for his drivers to arm themselves. The film premiered as the opening film of AFI Fest on November 6, 2014, and it was released theatrically on December 31, 2014. It garnered positive reviews, and J. C. Chandor, Neal Dodson, and Anna Gerb won the National Board of Review Award for Best Film.

Critic Reviews

'The underside of the American Dream is on display in A Most Violent Year, a drama about an immigrant trying to make his way to the top.' Toronto Sun 'Bradford Young's cinematography is awesome, transforming bleak wastelands and mansions into visions of light. It's as if we're seeing everything through the eyes of Morales, to whom America is beauty incarnate.' London Evening Standard 'Simmering with drama, A Most Violent Year is one of the best films yet from Isaac or Chandor, and that's saying something' One Room with a View

Awards

Broadcast Film Critics Association Awards 2015 Winner Critics' Choice MVP Award Jessica Chastain CINE Golden Eagle Film and Video Competition 2015 Winner Golden Eagle Narrative Content: Feature - Live Action A24 CinEuphoria Awards 2016 Winner CinEuphoria Top Ten of the Year - Audience Award IGN Summer Movie Awards 2014 Winner IGN Award Best Movie Supporting Actress Jessica Chastain
Paul, a teenager in the underground scene of early-nineties Paris, forms a DJ collective with his friends and together they plunge into the nightlife of sex, drugs, and endless music.

Eden uses 1990s club culture as the appropriately intoxicating backdrop for a sensitive, low-key look at aging and the price of pursuing one's dreams.

Eden is a 2014 French drama film directed by Mia Hansen-Løve and co-written with Sven Hansen-Løve. The film stars Félix de Givry and Pauline Etienne. The film premiered in the Special Presentations section of the 2014 Toronto International Film Festival. It was also screened in the 52nd edition of the New York Film Festival and the BFI London Film Festival.

The film is an affecting trip into the electronic dance movement in Paris whose rhythms echo its textures and feeling. Based on the experiences of Hansen-Løve's brother Sven, the film follows Paul, a teenager in the underground scene of early-nineties Paris. Rave parties dominate that culture, but he's drawn to the more soulful rhythms of Chicago's garage house. He forms a DJ collective named Cheers, and together he and his friends plunge into the ephemeral nightlife of sex, drugs, and endless music.

Critic Reviews

'Rambling, talky and luxuriantly wistful, the film gives a perceptive survey of the self-importance and decadence of a youth movement.' Times UK

'A remarkable film which drums to its own beat.' Little White Lies

'Partly the story of a music scene, but mostly the story of a man who realises that living the dream isn't always the best thing for your life. Vivid, immersive and blessed with a perfectly nostalgic soundtrack.' Empire Magazine

'Eden, in its loose and free-form way, is as personal a statement as this 34-year-old director has yet made: it's telling that Paul is that age by the end of it.' Daily Telegraph UK

'Absorbing and very moving.' The Guardian

La Vie En Rose
Biopic of the iconic French singer Édith Piaf. Raised by her grandmother in a brothel, she was discovered while singing on a street corner at the age of 19. Despite her success, Piaf's life was filled with tragedy.

La Vie en Rose is a 2007 French biographical musical film about the life of French singer Édith Piaf. The film was co-written and directed by Olivier Dahan, and starred Marion Cotillard as Piaf.

Cotillard's performance earned her several accolades including the Academy Award for Best Actress — marking the first time an Oscar had been given for a French-language role — the BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role, the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy and the César Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role for her performance. The film also won the Academy Award for Best Makeup, the BAFTA Award for Best Makeup, Costume Design, Film Music, four additional César Awards and grossed $86.3 million worldwide.


Critic Reviews

‘Despite its story of suffering that comes in unceasing waves, La Vie en Rose may be the most hopeful film yet made about the grueling rigor of living.’ Charleston City Paper

‘In La Vie En Rose,we get to witness a rare and beautiful thing - an artist baring her soul and creating a performance for the ages.’ The Dispatch

‘In La Vie en Rose, Marion Cotillard has the role of a lifetime. And she relishes it.’ Fayette Weekly

Awards

Academy Awards, USA 2008 Winner Oscar Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role Marion Cotillard

Best Achievement in Makeup Didier Lavergne, Jan Archibald

Golden Globes, USA 2008 Winner Golden Globe Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture - Comedy or Musical

Winner Anthony Asquith Award for Film MusicChristopher Gunning

Winner BAFTA Film Award Best Leading Actress Marion Cotillard

Best Costume Design Marit Allen

Best Make Up & Hair

César Awards, France 2008 Winner César Best Actress (Meilleure actrice) Marion Cotillard

Best Cinematography (Meilleure photographie) Tetsuo Nagata

Best Production Design (Meilleurs décors) Olivier Raoux

Best Costume Design (Meilleurs costumes) Marit Allen

Best Sound (Meilleur son) Laurent Zeilig

Hollywood Film Awards 2007 Winner Hollywood Film Award Actress of the Year

Departures
A newly unemployed cellist takes a job preparing the dead for funerals. Director Yojiro Takita and writer Kundo Koyama examine the rituals surrounding death in Japan with this tale of an out-of-work cellist who accepts a job as a "Nokanashi" or "encoffineer" (the Japanese equivalent of an undertaker) in order to provide for himself and his young wife. Winner of an Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film of the Year, Departures is a 2008 Japanese drama film directed by Yōjirō Takita and starring Masahiro Motoki, Ryōko Hirosue, and Tsutomu Yamazaki. The film follows a young man who returns to his hometown after a failed career as a cellist and stumbles across work as a nōkanshi—a traditional Japanese ritual mortician. He is subjected to prejudice from those around him, including from his wife, because of strong social taboos against people who deal with death.

Critic Reviews

‘Fascinating, witty and heartfelt.’ Times UK ‘Moments of clarity and pragmatism are contradicted by flashes of inanity and dry, if well-delivered humour.’ Little White Lies ‘Departure's cynicism, ironically, is what makes the optimism of its last act so moving.’ London Evening Standard

Awards

Academy Awards, USA 2009, winner of an Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film of the Year Asia Pacific Screen Awards 2009, Asia Pacific Screen Award winner of the Best Performance by an Actor Asian Film Awards 2009, winner of the Asian Film Award for Best Actor Hong Kong Film Awards 2010, winner of best asian film
Four American soldiers and one Brit fighting in Europe during World War II struggle to return to Allied territory after being separated from U.S. forces during the historic Malmedy Massacre.

Saints and Soldiers is a 2003 war drama film directed by Ryan Little and produced by Little and Adam Abel. It is loosely based on events that took place after the Malmedy massacre during the Battle of the Bulge. The film stars Corbin Allred, Alexander Niver, Lawrence Bagby, and Peter Asle Holden as the four American soldiers trying to return Kirby Heyborne, a British soldier with vital intelligence, to the Allied lines.

The Washington Times called the film, "one of the sharpest and most compelling entries of the early 'Mormon cinema' era". The New York Times wrote that the film's, "impressive cast of largely unknown actors and meticulously researched film tells its story with quiet conviction."

Critic Review

'It has the strengths and the clean lines of a traditional war movie, without high-tech special effects to pump up the noise level.' Chicago Sun Times

'Thoughtful, engaging World War II movie has battle violence.' Common Sense Media

Awards

Gloria Film Festival 2003 Winner of the Audience Award and Winner of the Jury Award

Heartland International Film Festival 2003 Winner of the Crystal Heart Award and Winner of the Grand Prize for Dramatic Feature

Ojai Film Festival 2003 Winner of the Best Narrative Feature

Sacramento Festival of Cinema 2003 Winner of the Audience Award

San Diego Film Festival 2003 Winner of the Audience Award

Temecula Valley International Film Festival 2003 Winner of the Viewer's Choice Award for Best Feature Film

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